About your Search

20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion is still not known; officials said today there's no evidence of foul play. a man using his cell phone captured the moment last night when the west fertilizer company plant exploded. that flattened buildings within a five blocks rand sent ockwes outiles around. >> i was actually picked up and th fy bout te end of m
, the technology giant reported today that the company's profits beatned, and it can still analysts' expectations. the maker has seen a steep drop, falling since september. they were meant to protect the people against explosions. it turns out the bomb detectors were fake. the millionaire businessman and sold them has learned his fate. he was convicted of fraud in britain after an investigation by the bbc uncovered the faulty devices. our world affairs correspondent. >> this is how it was advertised, a slick sales pitch and he sold at around the world. the claims backed by no signs whatsoever. it made some businessmen appearing here an extremely wealthy man. complete with room and a staff swimming pool as well as houses in florida, cyprus, and they ought to. -- a yacht. iraq was the main market for his fake detectors. he sold thousands to the government for a total of $85 million. device in this countries that are wracked with terrorism and explosions. he has paid no heed to the people who stood on check points and security posts, believing this device worked. >> he went to baghdad after a string
? >> i think that that is true. you're looking at what is going to enable the technology to get to the most patients the quickest and the most reliably. frankly myriad has done a great job of doing that because there are more people who have gotten this test than i think would have gotten it otherwise more consistently and more reliably than if it had been scattered among hundreds of thousands of individual research labs. >> brown: ellen, address that specifically. that claim has been put out there that scholarly work has hardly been stopped. there's been plenty of research done. i mean studies of the research done on this. >> i think those of us in the know will tell you that this has had a chilling effect on research and not as much research has been able to be done. one company has had a monopoly on this testing. for companies and laboratories that wanted to find better ways to look for mutations, faster ways, less expensive ways, they've been stopped. yes, myriad has done a great job of marketing this test to a lot of people because they have a huge financial incentive. but
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)